Frequently Asked Questions

Q: I don’t know what’s already been developed. Are there examples of current IS publicly available tools, resources, and products?

A: We encourage applicants to use the 2021 CCIS Meeting Summary Report and action group priorities, as well as other resources to understand what IS work has already been accomplished. Joining the action groups via SLACK is an additional avenue for understanding what has been or what is currently under development. To join the action group SLACK channels, email ccis@icf.com.

Q: I am interested in developing tools, resources, and products in Spanish. Can I still apply?

A: Publicly available tools, resources, and products can be produced in English, as well as other languages.

Q: I am interested in publishing a book or writing a scientific journal article. Would these tools, resources, and products be acceptable?

A: Open access articles are acceptable deliverables. A published book, however, wouldn’t be appropriate unless it’s a public good.

Q: My work focuses on IS projects. Must tools, resources, and products that are developed focus on cancer?

A: The call for proposals is to support the development of tools, resources, and products identified by CCIS Action Groups. Goods developed for public use must be linked to the action group priorities.

Q: What should individuals include in their project proposal?

A: The Project Proposal should describe the CCIS action group it supports and the specific priority it relates to. It should include the following elements:

  • The specific aims and general approach for the project.
  • The timeline and product(s) that will be delivered (timeline should be appropriate for the scope of work proposed). Include milestones and proposed level of effort.
  • A dissemination plan for the public good and how it will be made publicly available.
  • A mentoring plan if you are new to the field of IS.

Q: I am interested in applying. How is this call for proposals different from other funding opportunities?

A: The call for proposals is for a purchase agreement between an individual (consultant) and a contractor. The tools, resources, and products will be deliverables to ICF Next and will be published on the CCIS website for public use.

Payments will be provided upon invoice submission. Recipients may choose to invoice in monthly installments or based on individual milestones or hourly rates. ICF Next will provide an invoice template.

Q: Can individuals who belong to a Limited Liability Company (LLC) apply?

A: Purchase agreements will be awarded to individuals and not institutions, organizations, or companies. Individuals can submit via an LLC.

Q: What if I have support in developing the tools, resources, and products? Can I still apply?

A: Individuals can include in their project proposal and budget outside resources required to develop the tools, resources, and products (for example, a graphic designer or illustrator would be acceptable).

Q: What is a 1099 contractor and an independent contractor?

A: A 1099 contractor is a legal and tax-related term used in the United States to refer to the type of worker who contracts their services out to a business or businesses. These contractors exist in multiple fields — from hospital planners, to marketing consultants, to building contractors, to freelance writers. The “1099” refers to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) form that an independent contractor receives stating their income from a given business during a given tax year. A 1099 contractor is not an employee of the business or businesses with which they work; instead, they are an independent contractor, or consultant, who is considered to be self-employed. Like most self-employed workers, they do not typically receive employee benefits, such as health insurance or retirement benefits, but they may have more flexible work schedules and locations. A 1099 tax form is issued to vendors or subcontractors during the normal course of business when paid more than $600, and is applicable to individuals, partnerships, Limited Liability Companies (LLC), Limited Partnerships (LP), or Estates.

An independent contractor is identified as anyone that acts/works alone without the employment of ICF Next. An independent contractor is a self-employed person or entity contracted to perform work or provide services as a non-employee. As a result, independent contractors must pay their own Social Security and Medicare taxes.